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Oh Kale!

My love for kale began about 5 years ago, and it grows every year! Once when I served my mother-in-law kale, she admitted that her only experience with kale was when she worked at restaurants, “They decorate the salad bar with kale. I didn’t know you could eat it.” Sure it brightens up the salad bar, but why not take some for your plate? I wonder what they do with all that kale. All I can say – What A Waste!

Kale is rich in beta carotene, vitamin K, vitamin C, vitamin A, and phytonutrients. It’s an excellent anti-oxidant. Eating kale during pregnancy is very important. It contains calcium, iron, and folic acid. Folic acid helps develop your baby’s nervous system. Kale can even increase your breast milk supply.

Don’t let your lack of knowledge on this green stop you from reaping its benefits. Throw some in your grocery cart next time, and get creative in your kitchen. With Internet access, it’s easy to “google” a recipe and try something new. Here are a few fast and easy ways to get this green in your life: throw some in your next salad, add it to your favorite soups, casseroles, pastas, or substitute it for spinach (no offense, spinach!) in a recipe. Steam it. Saute it.

 

I have a couple recipes that are oldies but goodies. 

 

Kale in a Skillet: Heat some olive oil. Throw in a little garlic and onion if you like. Wash, chop, and stem your kale. Put it in the skillet. After a few minutes, add a couple tablespoons of water, and cook it to your tenderness. I kind of like mine a little crunchy. Add a splash of Bragg’s Amino Acid or balsamic vinegar. Add some salt and pepper. Good to go!

 

Kale Chips/Roasted Kale: Wash and chop kale. Toss with a little olive oil and sprinkle with salt. Bake it in the oven at 350 degrees for about 10 minutes. Check on it to see if it’s crispy.

 

You can grow kale in our area too. It’s fairly easy. I’m not an avid gardener. I play around some, but my first time we had it growing out of our ears. It’s a Fall/Winter crop for us. Plant it a few weeks before our first frost. It will grow all Winter and even into the Spring. It doesn’t like day time temperatures above 75 degrees, and we just cover ours up with a sheet or tarp when it goes below 30. And a frost even sweetens the flavor. I’m sure that there are more technical ways to plant it, but to be quite honest, we just threw some seeds out there, raked them over, and watered them. We didn’t thin or anything. That may be a faux pas, but it worked and it was easy.

If anyone has any kale recipes that are out of this world, I’d love to try them out. I can’t get enough of this green. Come on all you mamas. Give it a try. It’s good for you and your baby. And it’s Yummy too!!!